Vertical Lift Consulting Welcomes Daniel Ledding to the Team

Vertical Lift Consulting Welcomes Daniel Ledding to the Team

Daniel Ledding Jr., a 20-year combat medic and flight paramedic from Selah, Washington, joined the Vertical Lift Consulting team January 3 as Director of Training and Business Development. Ledding will work alongside CEO David Creech to provide on-site training opportunities featuring the Breeze-Eastern external rescue hoists and the Zephyr ZGS-10000-series Rescue Hoist Ground Support Equipment (RHGSE) and ZGS-15000-series MagSens, in cooperation with Breeze-Eastern LLC and Zephyr International LLC, respectively. Ledding, originally from Dubuque, Iowa, joined the U.S. Army in 2000 and spent the next two decades as ambulance aidman and driver, SERE senior medic, flight platoon sergeant and ultimately detachment…
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Static Discharge Cable Removed from AWR 980

A number of years ago, based on numerous requests from the field, the #415 Static Discharge Cable (manufactured by Lifesaving Systems Corporation (LSC)) was added to AWR 980. This cable can be used to dissipate the static discharge that is sometimes experienced during hoisting operations. Since then, there have been requests about similar products made by other manufacturers. The decision was recently made to remove the static discharge cable from AWR 980 – not because it can no longer be used, but because its use does not require an AWR to begin with. It does not have an ON/OFF switch,…
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Inspecting Grooves on Level Wind Shafts

A question was recently asked about inspection of the grooves on the level wind shafts. An inspection of the level wind shafts is called out in TM 1-1520-237- and 280-PMI as follows: "Check hoist rollers and level wind for wear, corrosion, and security." Someone digging deeper into Breeze-Eastern’s Flight Line Operation and Maintenance Manual (OMM) for the hoist would notice the following diagram in Section 501 – Checks and Inspections: In addition to the PMI, the level winds should be inspected any time the width of the grooves is suspect (for instance, you notice metal shavings in/around the grooves or…
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Removing #2 Engine Inlet with EMRH (US Army Black Hawk)

Removal of the Engine Inlets is required during the “EVERY 120 HOURS” inspection on the Black Hawk helicopter in order to access and inspect the engine output shafts. Left engine inlet shown. This is usually pretty straightforward except…well, the external hoist is in the way for the #2 (right side) engine inlet. Units with the ESSS-Mounted Rescue Hoist (EMRH) have fewer options than units with the Integrated Hoist Mount (IHM). Units with the EMRH can either remove the hoist, which can be a lot of work, or they can finagle the “arm” in such a way to create the required…
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Popping Hoist Circuit Breaker During Squib Check

An aircraft just came out of phase and everything seems to be checking out, with one exception – the hoist. The hoist itself operates fine, but every time you do the published squib check the 5A hoist cable shear circuit breaker on the DC ESNTL BUS pops. As with any troubleshooting related to the hoist, you know that the problem is either hoist-related, aircraft-related, or it is somehow related to one of the harnesses in between the hoist and the aircraft. You are putting the same external hoist back on the aircraft, so you don’t suspect that is the problem…
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A Caution about Removing External Hoist from Aircraft

An external hoist was recently submitted on an Army Product Quality Deficiency Report (PQDR), after having “structural failure” and “broken hardware.” Specifically, there was a fracture of the mid-section on the right side of the hoist, between the tension roller and the inboard level wind shaft, as well as a broken cap screw. These deficiencies were confirmed by Breeze-Eastern upon receipt of the subject hoist. Initial failure analysis revealed that some of the hardware on the three primary structural components (mid-section housing, and left and right flanges) was “missing, loose, or found to be deformed.” Those components were sent out…
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Cable Reseat vs Post-Operational Check…one defeats the other?

You completed hoist operations for the day and concluded your flight with a cable reseat of 150 lbs. After shutdown, the aircraft was towed into the hangar and, per the required Post Operational Check in the Army checklist, the “amount of cable used” was reeled out in order to inspect it for “corrosion, kinks, separated strands, wear, and broken or frayed wires.” Question: "What good did a reseat do for me if I’m just going to follow it up with a cable inspection that leaves loose wraps on the drum?" That’s a very good question and one that has been…
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More About Recurring Inspections and the Hoist Placed-in-Service Inspection

Numerous questions still linger for Army users about what inspections must be completed for the Breeze-Eastern external rescue hoist. Such questions are understandable since the Technical Manuals are not always clear...and what is there often differs from manufacturer recommendations. So, what inspections are REQUIRED for this hoist and when am I required to do them? The REQUIRED inspections for Army users are driven through the Legitimate Code File (LCF) and filter down to users in the form of recurring -18 inspections. The recurring inspections REQUIRED for the BL-29900-30-1 hoist are: Operational Check – due every time the cable is changed…
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P/N Correction on Hoist Crushable Bumper

This is a US Army issue... TM 1-1520-237-23&P shows the hoist crushable bumper/spring assembly in WP 3415, Fig 14-4, Item 23. The Repair Parts and Special Tools List (RPSTL) gives the NSN for this Item as 5340-01-512-0408 and the P/N as BL-12750-3. TM 1-1520-28-023&P is the same except that it is Item 24. The TMs are incorrect. BL-12750-3 is a shorter crushable bumper and was replaced by BL-15975-3 with the issuance of Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) BL-12756-1-A25-01 in 2002. The correct P/N is BL-15975-3. The current NSN also does not list the new P/N and that has caused some problems…
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Clearing Up Confusion About Hoist Mid-Section Covers

There are two hoist mid-section covers that cover the drum, level-winds, and part of the cable guide assembly. These two covers consist of an upper cover (plastic with clear panel) and a lower cover (metal) that protects the wiring harnesses that cross over from the motor to the controller. These covers get removed whenever a cable is changed and for the recurring measurements of the tension roller (every 6 months). They also get removed for replacement of either the pressure roller assembly or tension roller – both of which are outside Army Technical Manual (TM) authorized maintenance and require approval…
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