Popping Hoist Circuit Breaker During Squib Check

An aircraft just came out of phase and everything seems to be checking out, with one exception – the hoist. The hoist itself operates fine, but every time you do the published squib check the 5A hoist cable shear circuit breaker on the DC ESNTL BUS pops. As with any troubleshooting related to the hoist, you know that the problem is either hoist-related, aircraft-related, or it is somehow related to one of the harnesses in between the hoist and the aircraft. You are putting the same external hoist back on the aircraft, so you don’t suspect that is the problem…
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Now Offering Zephyr Training

Now Offering Zephyr Training

In coordination with Zephyr International LLC, Vertical Lift Consulting is now offering training for the Zephyr Rescue Hoist Ground Support Equipment (RHGSE). Training is available for this equipment in one of two ways: On-site at the manufacturer’s location in Conway, SC.Off-site where we bring the training to you. Our training will mirror the 2021 On-Site curriculum for Zephyr International, which is now limited to one day with a maximum of ten (10) students. The 2021 schedule for on-site classes is as follows: Thursday, 28 JANThursday, 15 APRThursday, 24 JUNThursday, 26 AUGThursday, 28 OCT You can register for these classes or…
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A Caution about Removing External Hoist from Aircraft

An external hoist was recently submitted on an Army Product Quality Deficiency Report (PQDR), after having “structural failure” and “broken hardware.” Specifically, there was a fracture of the mid-section on the right side of the hoist, between the tension roller and the inboard level wind shaft, as well as a broken cap screw. These deficiencies were confirmed by Breeze-Eastern upon receipt of the subject hoist. Initial failure analysis revealed that some of the hardware on the three primary structural components (mid-section housing, and left and right flanges) was “missing, loose, or found to be deformed.” Those components were sent out…
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Update on Hoist Cable Set Screws

What is the purpose of the cable set screw? You know…that small screw that gets torqued to 10-12 in-lbs after installation of a new hoist cable? Let’s start off by saying what IS NOT the purpose of the screw. It IS NOT the purpose of the screw to hold the rated load of the hoist (600 lbs). If that WAS the purpose, it would need to be a much larger screw, indeed! So, if it is not the purpose of the set screw to hold the load, then what IS its purpose? The purpose of that screw is simply to…
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Tagline Techniques, Part 1

Taglines are used to minimize spin, swing, and oscillation (conical rotation) of hoist devices. Spin is an issue because the hoist hook has a swivel bearing. That swivel bearing is a must so that torsional forces in the cable (above the hook) can depart the system. Without it, the cable would unravel. An unfortunate by-product is that everything below the hook can also rotate and that can present its own challenges. Spin typically results from the effects of air movement (e.g. wind or rotor downwash). A suspended object will rotate so as to present its smallest surface area to that…
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Ultra-Lok Enters Testing

Ultra-Lok Enters Testing

The auto-locking hoist hooks have gotten a lot of press in the last couple of years, and for good reason – dynamic rollout is a “clear and present danger” when using hoisted devices that are susceptible to rollout and when using hooks that can be in an unlocked state while lifting. To recap, dynamic rollout (also called “ring rollout,” “hook rollout,” “forced rollout,” or just “rollout”) is the unintentional separation of a hoisted device (rescue strop, seat, basket, litter, etc) from the hook. Rollout can only occur if all three of the following conditions exists: Susceptibility – the geometry of…
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More About Recurring Inspections and the Hoist Placed-in-Service Inspection

Numerous questions still linger for Army users about what inspections must be completed for the Breeze-Eastern external rescue hoist. Such questions are understandable since the Technical Manuals are not always clear...and what is there often differs from manufacturer recommendations. So, what inspections are REQUIRED for this hoist and when am I required to do them? The REQUIRED inspections for Army users are driven through the Legitimate Code File (LCF) and filter down to users in the form of recurring -18 inspections. The recurring inspections REQUIRED for the BL-29900-30-1 hoist are: Operational Check – due every time the cable is changed…
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P/N Correction on Hoist Crushable Bumper

This is a US Army issue... TM 1-1520-237-23&P shows the hoist crushable bumper/spring assembly in WP 3415, Fig 14-4, Item 23. The Repair Parts and Special Tools List (RPSTL) gives the NSN for this Item as 5340-01-512-0408 and the P/N as BL-12750-3. TM 1-1520-28-023&P is the same except that it is Item 24. The TMs are incorrect. BL-12750-3 is a shorter crushable bumper and was replaced by BL-15975-3 with the issuance of Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) BL-12756-1-A25-01 in 2002. The correct P/N is BL-15975-3. The current NSN also does not list the new P/N and that has caused some problems…
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Clearing Up Confusion About Hoist Mid-Section Covers

There are two hoist mid-section covers that cover the drum, level-winds, and part of the cable guide assembly. These two covers consist of an upper cover (plastic with clear panel) and a lower cover (metal) that protects the wiring harnesses that cross over from the motor to the controller. These covers get removed whenever a cable is changed and for the recurring measurements of the tension roller (every 6 months). They also get removed for replacement of either the pressure roller assembly or tension roller – both of which are outside Army Technical Manual (TM) authorized maintenance and require approval…
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